Tag: RV Living

My Best States for Winter RV Life

Fall is in the air, and winter is around the corner. For those of us who live in Residential Vehicles, cars, or vans, this time of year means we either winterize or move to warmer weather. I prefer to chase livable temps than to suffer through freezing cold days, snow, and ice. There are a few states I’ve wintered in, that are comfortable and offer plenty of boondocking. Below are my three favorite states for winter RV Life.

#1 Arizona

Arizona is snowbird mecca. Every year, thousands of RVers from the U.S. and Canada flock to Arizona for the warmer climate and plentiful boondocking on Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands. Quartzsite which is 128 miles west of Phoenix, is especially popular as it hosts the annual Tyson Wells Market and Swap Meet and the Rock and Gem Show. There are plenty of campgrounds, RV parks, Long Term Visitor Areas (LTVAs offer designated dispersed camping areas for around $180 for the entire season! So, you don’t have to worry about moving every 14 days like you do when dispersed camping on BLM lands) and vast deserts with ample BLM land for free dispersed camping.

Boondocking in Arizona for Winter RV Living

There are thousands, maybe millions, of acres of BLM land in Arizona. Just use an app like FreeCampsites.net or Campendium to find spots people recommend, or get a BLM map and explore on your own to find your own piece of desert paradise. I’ve explored the state from the Mexican border to the Grand Canyon and have found some gorgeous desert campsites. Just remember, when wintering here, stay in the lower elevations for warmer weather.

Temperatures During Winter RVing in Arizona

Just because you’re in the south doesn’t mean you’re going to be warm. Elevation plays a BIG role in temperatures. Remember, for every 1000’ in elevation you rise, the temperature gets three degrees cooler. So stay low for the warmest temperatures! Winter temperatures in the low elevations of Arizona are comfortable. They generally range from the 60s to 70s during the day and high 30s to 40s at night. It rarely drops below freezing at night south of Phoenix, so you won’t have to worry about freezing pipes.

#2 Southern California 

From Slab City to Anza Borrego State Park, Joshua Tree to the Mojave Preserve you can find some beautiful, quirky, and remote places to boondock in southeastern California.

Boondocking In CA for RV Winter Living

If you’re not afraid of anarchy and have some street smarts be sure to check out Slab City, they call it the last free place on earth (Learn more in the 4 part video series I did: https://youtu.be/Y3oNM53oEtg). You can actually live in Slab City if you want but it gets HOT in the Summer. Many nomads spend the entire winter there, enjoying the freedom and warmer winter temperatures.

If you’re looking for more solitude and less anarchy, Anza Borrego State park has free dispersed camping and it’s gorgeous! It can be a little crowded in some of the designated camping areas, so keep that in mind when you go.

There’s also camping near the Salton Sea which is a fascinating piece of CA history. If you really want to be alone explore the thousands of acres of the Mojave preserve, a pristine, desert with ample boondocking. But be sure to know before you go by checking out the website. You can’t boondock just anywhere within the preserve. There is also some decent boondocking on BLM land right outside of Joshua Tree National Park, which is a must-see if you’re in Southern California.

Temperatures for California During Winter RV Camping

Winter temperatures in the Salton City area are between 70 and 80 during the day and 50s at night. With Anza Borrego being about 10 degrees cooler and the Joshua tree area about 15-20 degrees cooler. The same weather/elevation rule applies here. The higher you go, the colder. Be sure to always check the forecast before traveling to higher elevations so you don’t get stranded in snow!

#3 Nevada and New Mexico Winter RVing

Both are a little higher in elevation than the areas I mentioned above. But, if you want less crowds and can handle cooler temps, you’re in for a winter RV life treat! There is plenty of BLM land in both Southern New Mexico and Nevada, and you won’t find the snowbird crowd in the heart of winter.

Boondocking in Nevada and New Mexico to Enjoy Winter RV Life

Nevada: there is boondocking south of Las Vegas on HWY 95 at the Dry Lake Bed and plenty in Pahrump, just about 60 miles northwest of Vegas. (Remember to check your camping apps!). Going north of Pahrump takes you higher in elevation, where the temps will be colder, and you’re more likely to get snow. BEWARE: And check weather forecast before you go so you don’t get stranded in snow!!! Storms can come out of nowhere and dump inches, if not feet very quickly in higher elevations.

New Mexico: The southernmost part of the state is the warmest. I’ve stayed in the Carlsbad, NM area, and while not pretty, it is warmer and not very crowded. There is some boondocking not far from the world-famous Carlsbad Caverns. New Mexico also offers an annual State Park Pass, which is a great deal! Most parks are open year-round, and they’re empty. You can go plug-in when it gets too cold!

Temperatures During the Winter in Nevada and New Mexico for RV Living

Temperatures in both southern NM ad NV are similar. The days will be in the 50s to low 60s, and the nights in the 20s to 30s. You’re also likely to get snow – oh and strong winds! But if you don’t mind the cooler temps, and you can handle one or two nights below freezing, without worrying about your pipes freezing, you’ll be rewarded with quiet and solitude.

Before you go, be sure to check out my video below for cheap and simple tips for keeping your RV Warmer in winter without a lot of effort or technical know-how. And if your solar doesn’t quite cut it with the shorter days and cloudier weather, check out the Jackery Power Station. It’s been a great addition to my RV Life for running my laptop, charging camera batteries and phones, running my coffee grinder and Nutri-Bullet and more!

What’s Your Favorite RV Living Winter Spot?

There you have it! My favorite Winter RV Living areas! Of course, many snowbirds also winter in Florida and Texas. I like the Southwest and the drier climate, gorgeous desert sunsets, and lack of bugs!! Where do you like to spend your RV life winters? Let us know in the comments below!

Helpful Links:
My Favorite Things for RV Living
Finding Free Campsites
Safety Tips for Extreme Weather

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DISCLAIMER: Carolyn’s RV Life and Carolyn Higgins share her experiences, thoughts, opinions and ideas in this blog post and on this website for entertainment purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice, instruction or guidance. Viewers/Readers should consult with professionals before pursing any actions or behaviors exhibited in this video. Carolyn’s RV Life or Carolyn Higgins cannot be held liable in the event of any accident or injury that may occur as a result of application of procedures and information provided in this video.

Securing Your Campsite When You’re Gone

Leaving a Dispersed Camp for Supplies

Living in a Class R RV has many benefits, but it also has its drawbacks. People always ask if it would be easier towing a vehicle (“Toad”) for running errands and zipping around towns. And the bigger question is, what do I do when I need to leave camp to go get supplies? “How are you securing your campsite when you have to leave in your RV?”

Normally, I find a camp that I plan on staying at for the maximum amount of time, which is about 10-14 days, depending on how much I conserve my water. By then, I’m ready to move on. But sometimes in my travels, I might be seeking a one or two-nighter and get lucky and find a spot I want to stay at longer. That means I must run into the nearest town to supply up. So how do I secure my spot?

Make Your Dispersed Campsite Look “Lived-In”

First, I put a few things out to claim my camping spot. I usually leave my RV Rug and a cheap chair. You can also hang a clothesline or drape a tarp. If you have a cheap tent, put that up too, the more you can make the site look ‘lived in’ the better. Also, spread things out across your camp to claim all the space you need to feel comfortable and safe. AND NEVER leave anything you can’t live without! Leave only inexpensive, replaceable items in case they walk away while you’re gone.

Leave a Sign Securing Your Campsite

Second, I always leave a sign that the site is occupied and the date. This lets Rangers and other campers know that the site isn’t abandoned and that I plan on returning soon. Use a sharpie and a big piece of cardboard and prop it at the opening of your site on a chair, tree, or rock so that anyone who might be thinking of taking the spot will see it right away.

Supplied Up & Camp Secured

That’s all it takes to secure your camping spot in the National Forest or on BLM lands. Using these two simple tricks has saved my spot for a morning, afternoon or most of the day while I supply up.
Do you have any tips for saving your spot to run errands that I haven’t mentioned? Leave them in the comments below!

Looking for More RV Living Tips & Resources? Check out the link below!

How to Buy an RV to Live In

RV Products and Must Haves

Easy Tips to Find an RV to Live In Full Time

Subscribe to my YouTube Channel by clicking the icon above for more RV Life How-To and Not Tos.
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CarolynsRVLife.tv

DISCLAIMER: Carolyn’s RV Life and Carolyn Higgins share her experiences, thoughts, opinions and ideas in this blog post and on this website for entertainment purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice, instruction or guidance. Viewers/Readers should consult with professionals before pursing any actions or behaviors exhibited in this video. Carolyn’s RV Life or Carolyn Higgins cannot be held liable in the event of any accident or injury that may occur as a result of application of procedures and information provided in this video.

FIVE REASONS TO LIVE IN A CLASS C RV

If you had the choice to live in an RV, van, motorhome, School Bus, Class A, Class C, or Sprinter van what would you choose to live in??  There are many things to consider when purchasing the right Residential Vehicle for your nomad life or RV adventures.  For instance, are you interested in living in your RV(or as I like to call it, Residential Vehicle) full-time or even part-time, it’s important to think about what is important to you.

Can you live in a confined space for months and months and be comfortable/happy?  Do you need a vehicle to separate from your rig (A “Toad”) because you are a city explorer and less of a nature explorer?  Will you be boondocking or staying in National Parks, RV Parks and campgrounds?

Most of you know, I’m a nature wanderer.  I love boondocking and finding the hidden treasures our Public Lands have to offer. If you are like me and are considering an RV life-style and enjoy boondocking, This is a must-read blog for preparing for your RV Living adventures!

Below, I’m going to share five simple reason why I chose to live in a Class C for full-time RV living.

Vehicles for RV Living

WHY I LIVE IN A CLASS C RV

#1: Why I chose a Class C vs. Class A?  I like the van chassis. It actually sits on a Ford E450 Van Chassis as opposed to a Class A which is typically on a commercial bus chassis.  So, if I need any work done it’s just a Ford van as opposed to something more complicated.

#2: Why did I choose a Motorhome vs. Van?  More space of course!  I spend a lot of time inside, working from my laptop.  I didn’t want to feel like I was in a cave, feeling claustrophobic, and have to sit on a bed.  Having my table and bench to work from is so much more comfortable.  And most importantly, I have windows!!! I can gaze out them and let the light shine in as I work!

There is also more headroom to walk around and having a full kitchen is important to me. 

Full-Time RVing

RV SAFETY & DRIVABLILITY CONSIDERATIONS

#3: Why I chose a Class C vs. Trailor?  Above all, safety. I like not having to exit my living courters to get in the driver’s seat.  For safety as a solo female RVer and nomad, I like that I can easily get from my living quarters to my driver’s seat without having to go outside of the rig.  Think about it, it’s like being trapped in a big box if you are in a questionable situation.  Therefore, I wanted to know I could easily and quickly leave a situation I’m not comfortable with.

#4: What I like about my Class C vs. Class A? Most certainly, it’s size. I like that the Class C is smaller, more aerodynamic and has higher clearance making it easier to drive on the less traveled roads for boondocking.  Another thing to consider is that a Class C is easier drive through trees and brush.

RVing

RV SHOPPING: MORE BANG FOR THE BUCK

#5: Price.  Both my Class C RVs cost less than Sprinter and Coachmen Vans (both of which I considered).  It’s a considerable difference when you are looking at a used sprinter van that can cost $67,000 versus used Class C in good condition for around $15,000 (when I bought mine, they’ve gone up a lot since!).

There you have it!  Five simple reasons for choosing a Class C for full-time RV living.  I hope this helped and I hope you will find yourself living your best RV life soon!  Until next time friendlies… be Happy, be Free, be Kind!

Check out this three part video to help you choose the right RV!

Check out the Playlist below for more info on how to start your RV Life!


More Helpful Video Links for RV Living:
Full-Time RV Living & How to Find a New Home State
How to Earn Income for Nomads
Things to Know About RV Life

Helpful Blogs on RV Life:
How Much Does RV Living Really Cost
How to Find the Right RV or Van to Live In

Subscribe to my YouTube Channel for more RV Life How-To and Not To.

DISCLAIMER: Carolyn’s RV Life and Carolyn Higgins share her experiences, thoughts, opinions and ideas in this blog post and on this website for entertainment purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice, instruction or guidance. Viewers/Readers should consult with professionals before pursing any actions or behaviors exhibited in this video. Carolyn’s RV Life or Carolyn Higgins cannot be held liable in the event of any accident or injury that may occur as a result of application of procedures and information provided in this video.

10 Must Have Items for Full-Time RV Living

I shared the 10 Must Have Items for Full-Time RV Living in a recent video to help you prepare for full time RV or Van Life.

After living in an RV for nearly 4 years, I’ve learned there are some tools, services and products that I can’t live without. I share those with you and why they’re critical to successful and comfortable full time RV Life!

RV Living and Van Life Necessities

Here are a few of the must have items for Full-Time RV Living or van dwelling, I cover in the video. You can get the full list – and why they’re so important – in the video!

  1. Good Road- Side Assistance. Not all RV Road Side Assistance plans are created equal – make sure you know what to look for! Watch now!
  2. Nationwide Guarantees and Service Plans – don”t be stranded in Hell Michigan with a warranty only good in Texas! Here’s how to get the best service plans!
  3. The Right Tools – I go over ALL the tools you need to take care of yourself in an emergency. There might be a few here that surprise you!

You can watch the video here!

What are some of the items you’ve found critical to successful RV Living or Van Dwelling? Leave your comments below!